Stern of World War II U.S. destroyer discovered off remote Alaskan island

August 15, 2018 – For almost 75 years, the stern of the destroyer USS Abner Read lay somewhere below the dark surface of the Bering Sea off the Aleutian island of Kiska, where it sank after being torn off by an explosion while conducting an anti-submarine patrol. Seventy-one U.S. Navy Sailors were lost in the aftermath of the blast, during a brutal and largely overlooked early campaign of World War II. Heroic action by the crew saved the ship, but for the families of the doomed Sailors, the final resting…

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Chat Online with NOAA Scientists June 14

We are Derek Sowers (NOAA seafloor mapping expert), Kasey Cantwell (NOAA ocean explorer), Cheryl Morrison (research geneticist, USGS), and Leslie Sautter (geologist, College of Charleston). We are joined by the Mission Team on board NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to answer your questions about our current expedition of Deep-Sea Habitats of the Southeast U.S. Continental Margin. From June 11- July 2, 2018, NOAA and partners will conduct an ocean exploration expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to collect critical baseline information about unknown and poorly known deepwater areas in the Southeast…

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NOAA teams up with India to strengthen ocean observations

In a remote region of the Indian Ocean lies the source of a mysterious weather pattern with tentacles that stretch across the tropics, influencing everything from monsoons in India to heat waves and flooding in the United States. Scientists and crew tend to an observing buoy in the Indian Ocean. This buoy is one of 46 observing instruments in the RAMA array. Not as well known as El Nino, this phenomenon is called the Madden-Julian Oscillation, named for Rolland Madden and Paul Julian, two scientists who discovered it in the…

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Forecasters predict a near- or above-normal 2018 Atlantic hurricane season

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a 75-percent chance that the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season will be near- or above-normal. Forecasters predict a 35 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and a 25 percent chance of a below-normal season for the upcoming hurricane season, which extends from June 1 to November 30. “With the advances made in hardware and computing over the course of the last year, the ability of NOAA scientists to both predict the path of storms and warn Americans…

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Coast Guard, NOAA to include Navigation Rules in U.S. Coast Pilot

The U.S. Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have teamed up on a consolidated publication that will help mariners save time and money. The Coast Guard Office of Navigation Systems and NOAA Office of Coast Survey will incorporate the amalgamated International Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea (72 COLREGS) and the Inland Navigation Rules into NOAA’s U.S. Coast Pilot publications. To access Coast Pilot, visit https://www.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/publications/coast-pilot/index.html. The U.S. Coast Pilot publications already include the Coast Guard’s Vessel Traffic Service regulations. “Adding the Navigation Rules into the…

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Raytheon, NOAA win Aviation Week Laureate award for unmanned hurricane tracker

Raytheon Company and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received Aviation Week magazine’s prestigious Laureate award for using the Raytheon Coyote® unmanned aerial vehicle to provide near-real-time, potentially life-saving data during hurricanes. Dr. Joseph Cione, hurricane researcher at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory and principal investigator of NOAA’s Coyote project, holds the UAV in front of NOAA’s P-3 aircraft at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida. (Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Developed for the military, Coyote is a small, expendable UAV that’s air- or ground-launched into environments…

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NOAA satellites aid in the rescue of 275 lives in 2017

Last July, a sailboat with two people onboard caught on fire several hundred miles off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida. Luckily for the crew, a NOAA satellite picked up the distress signal from their emergency beacon, enabling the U.S. Air Force and Coast Guard to rescue them. They are among the 275 people rescued within the United States and its surrounding waters with the help of NOAA satellites last year. Of the 275 rescues, 186 were in water, 15 were from aviation incidents and 74 were on land using personal…

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Raytheon’s ground system, space sensor critical to NOAA s newest polar satellite s mission

NASA launched NOAA’s next-generation polar satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, into space November 18th. Two Raytheon weather programs are mission-critical components of the satellite’s mission: the JPSS Common Ground System and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite sensor. Svalbard, Norway, is home to part of a global network of receiving stations that process and distribute polar satellite data to users worldwide. Photo taken at Kongsberg Satellite Services plateau, October 11, 2017. (Photo courtesy of Reuben Wu) JPSS CGS, a global system of ground antennas and high-performance computers, provides the…

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NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in the Arctic

On Friday, August 25, U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy will sail from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, with a team of NOAA scientists and collaborators on a 22-day cruise to study environmental change in the western Arctic Ocean. Scientists will track ecosystem responses to rapidly changing environmental conditions such as sea ice decline, ocean acidification and rising air and water temperature, as the ship travels north through the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort seas. “We may be aboard an icebreaker, but we’re not likely to see much sea ice this summer and early…

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USCG et al Respond to Entangled Humpback Whale off Maui

March 13, 2017 – Sunday, an entangled subadult humpback whale was cut free by a team of trained responders off Maui. The animal was entangled in large gauge electrical cable that was deeply embedded in the whale’s mouth. All gear except what could not be pulled from the whale’s mouth was successfully cut and removed. The response was part of a two-day effort by responders from the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, U.S. Coast Guard, Maui Ocean Safety, Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission, and the West Maui response team. The team…

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MOAA Suggests Caution over Proposed Coast Guard and NOAA Budget Cuts

March 8, 2017 – Over the past week, the San Francisco Chronicle and Washington Post reported the president’s budget proposes significant cuts to the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), respectively. The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) issued the following statement in response to the current proposals to reduce Coast Guard and NOAA appropriations. “MOAA is concerned about recently proposed budget cuts for the Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,” said MOAA President and CEO retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Dana Atkins.…

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New Images From Space Show Earth and Solar Storms Like Never Before

March 6, 2017 – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the first images from two Earth and solar weather-monitoring space instruments aboard the GOES-16 satellite, which launched in November. Today’s images from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) are a first for continuous lightning tracking in geostationary orbit, 22,300 miles above the earth. Last week NOAA also released the first images from the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), which gives faster warning for solar storms. Both GLM and SUVI were designed and built at Lockheed Martin’s (NYSE: LMT) Advanced Technology Center…

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NOAA Releases First GOES-16 Image from Harris Corporation-Built Imager and Ground System

January 23, 2017 – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released the first image taken by Harris Corporation’s Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) onboard their next-generation weather satellite. The image taken from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-16 (GOES-16) is of Earth’s full western hemisphere with detailed cloud and water features. “Once the satellite is fully operational, the resolution of the imagery taken from the Harris ABI will be comparable to seeing a quarter from a mile away” The Harris ABI, the main payload on the satellite, is a high-resolution…

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