Raytheon, NOAA win Aviation Week Laureate award for unmanned hurricane tracker

Raytheon Company and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received Aviation Week magazine’s prestigious Laureate award for using the Raytheon Coyote® unmanned aerial vehicle to provide near-real-time, potentially life-saving data during hurricanes. Dr. Joseph Cione, hurricane researcher at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory and principal investigator of NOAA’s Coyote project, holds the UAV in front of NOAA’s P-3 aircraft at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida. (Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Developed for the military, Coyote is a small, expendable UAV that’s air- or ground-launched into environments…

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NOAA satellites aid in the rescue of 275 lives in 2017

Last July, a sailboat with two people onboard caught on fire several hundred miles off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida. Luckily for the crew, a NOAA satellite picked up the distress signal from their emergency beacon, enabling the U.S. Air Force and Coast Guard to rescue them. They are among the 275 people rescued within the United States and its surrounding waters with the help of NOAA satellites last year. Of the 275 rescues, 186 were in water, 15 were from aviation incidents and 74 were on land using personal…

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Raytheon’s ground system, space sensor critical to NOAA s newest polar satellite s mission

NASA launched NOAA’s next-generation polar satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, into space November 18th. Two Raytheon weather programs are mission-critical components of the satellite’s mission: the JPSS Common Ground System and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite sensor. Svalbard, Norway, is home to part of a global network of receiving stations that process and distribute polar satellite data to users worldwide. Photo taken at Kongsberg Satellite Services plateau, October 11, 2017. (Photo courtesy of Reuben Wu) JPSS CGS, a global system of ground antennas and high-performance computers, provides the…

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NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in the Arctic

On Friday, August 25, U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy will sail from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, with a team of NOAA scientists and collaborators on a 22-day cruise to study environmental change in the western Arctic Ocean. Scientists will track ecosystem responses to rapidly changing environmental conditions such as sea ice decline, ocean acidification and rising air and water temperature, as the ship travels north through the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort seas. “We may be aboard an icebreaker, but we’re not likely to see much sea ice this summer and early…

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USCG et al Respond to Entangled Humpback Whale off Maui

March 13, 2017 – Sunday, an entangled subadult humpback whale was cut free by a team of trained responders off Maui. The animal was entangled in large gauge electrical cable that was deeply embedded in the whale’s mouth. All gear except what could not be pulled from the whale’s mouth was successfully cut and removed. The response was part of a two-day effort by responders from the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, U.S. Coast Guard, Maui Ocean Safety, Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission, and the West Maui response team. The team…

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MOAA Suggests Caution over Proposed Coast Guard and NOAA Budget Cuts

March 8, 2017 – Over the past week, the San Francisco Chronicle and Washington Post reported the president’s budget proposes significant cuts to the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), respectively. The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) issued the following statement in response to the current proposals to reduce Coast Guard and NOAA appropriations. “MOAA is concerned about recently proposed budget cuts for the Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,” said MOAA President and CEO retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Dana Atkins.…

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New Images From Space Show Earth and Solar Storms Like Never Before

March 6, 2017 – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the first images from two Earth and solar weather-monitoring space instruments aboard the GOES-16 satellite, which launched in November. Today’s images from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) are a first for continuous lightning tracking in geostationary orbit, 22,300 miles above the earth. Last week NOAA also released the first images from the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), which gives faster warning for solar storms. Both GLM and SUVI were designed and built at Lockheed Martin’s (NYSE: LMT) Advanced Technology Center…

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NOAA Releases First GOES-16 Image from Harris Corporation-Built Imager and Ground System

January 23, 2017 – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released the first image taken by Harris Corporation’s Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) onboard their next-generation weather satellite. The image taken from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-16 (GOES-16) is of Earth’s full western hemisphere with detailed cloud and water features. “Once the satellite is fully operational, the resolution of the imagery taken from the Harris ABI will be comparable to seeing a quarter from a mile away” The Harris ABI, the main payload on the satellite, is a high-resolution…

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