USCG Aircraft

C-37A Gulfstream V

C-37A - Gulfstream V

Overview:

The Coast Guard operates two long-range Gulfstream V as its principal Command and Control transport for travel by the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Coast Guard Commandant, and other U.S. Officials. On lone flights, the C-37A can carry 12 passengers and a crew of four going Mach .80 at 51,000 feet cruising altitude, all with considerable fuel efficiency. The C-37A enjoys commonality of parts and supplies with more than a dozen C-37As operated by the Department of Defense.

Air Station

  • Washington, D.C. (Washington National Airport)

Specifications

Power Plant
Two 14,750-pound thrust BMW-Rolls-Royce BR710-48 turbofan engines
Performance
Cruising Speed: Mach 0.8 or 459 knots
Certified Ceiling: 54,000 feet
Range: 5,500 miles
Gross Weight
90,900 pounds
Dimensions
Wingspan: 93 feet, 6 inches
Length: 96 feet, 5 inches
Height: 25 feet, 10 inches

HC-144A The Ocean Sentry

HC-144A - Ocean Sentry

Overview:

From The Shield of Freedom, 2006: The HC-144A “Ocean Sentry” is a Maritime Patrol Aircraft produced by the Spanish subsidiary of the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Co. (EADS). First unveiled in 2006, the CN-235A (official USCG designation HC-144A) is currently being produced and delivered to the Coast Guard.

The aircraft were certified as the all-around Coast Guard choice for its Medium Range Surveillance (MRS) Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) by then Commandant Adm. Thomas Collins, in 2003. They are part of the Deepwater program, an extensive acquisition overhaul that touches the entire Coast Guard fleet of operational forces.

The HC-144A will assume Coast Guard medium range surveillance and transport requirements, replacing the HU-25 and some HC-130s. The Ocean Sentry has the capability to perform aerial delivery of search and rescue equipment such as rafts, pumps, and flares, and it can serve as an on-scene commander platform for homeland security missions, since it is outfitted with the IDS Command and Control (C2) System, and the state-of-the-art C4ISR suite of sensors and avionics. The aircraft will be particularly effective at locating targets in a large search area, and vectoring prosecution assets to the targets.

The HC-144As modern C4ISR suite, modular cabin, miserly fuel consumption rate, and short field takeoff and landing capability make it uniquely suited for USCG missions.

Air Station

  • CGAS Cape Cod, MA
  • CGAS Miami, FL
  • CGAS Mobile, AL

Air Stations (planned)

  • CGAS Astoria, OR
  • CGAS Borinquen, PR
  • CGAS Corpus Christi, TX
  • CGAS Elizabeth City, NC
  • CGAS Naval Base Ventura County, CA

Specifications

Power Plant
Two 1,750 shp (1,305kW) General Electric CT7-9C3 turboprop engines
Performance
Max Speed: 246 knots 
Cruising Speed: 230 knots 
Range: 2,000 nautical miles 
Endurance: 11.5 hours
Maximum Takeoff Weight
36,380 pounds
Dimensions
Length: 70 feet, 2 inches
Wing Span: 84 feet 8 inches

HC-130J Super Hercules

HC-130J - Super Hercules

The USCG has been flying HC-130J aircraft since the first aircraft was delivered in 2003 and went into initial operational capability in 2008. There are currently six HC-130J aircraft in the USCG inventory with an additional three on order through the manufacturer. All operational aircraft are based at the air station in Elizabeth City, NC, and operate primarily off the eastern seaboard. The HC-130J aircraft are worldwide deployable and can often be found supporting counter-narcotics operations in the Eastern Pacific, long range Search and Rescue in the Atlantic, or marine safety missions operating  International Ice Patrol from Newfoundland, Canada.

The HC-130J aircraft has a unique mission system suite installed on the aircraft. The mission system suite includes a two operator workstation on the flight deck, a nose-mounted EO/IR pod, a belly-mounted surface search radar, as well as other communication and surveillance sensors.

The HC-130J is a major upgrade from the legacy C-130’s employed by the USCG since 1959. The cockpit avionics upgrades, coupled with more efficient engine and propeller designs, allow the aircraft to fly higher, get on scene faster, stay on scene longer and fly safer than any other fixed wing aircraft in the USCG inventory. This allows for significant savings in terms of operational and logistical costs.

 The USCG plans to replace all older model HC-130H aircraft with HC-130J aircraft by 2027.

Air Stations

  • Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina – 5 aircraft

Specifications

Power Plant
Four 5,600 hp Allison 2100 turboprop engines
Performance
Cruising Speed: 374 mph
Service Ceiling: 33,000 ft
Range: 5,000 miles
Weight
Empty: 75,743 lbs
Gross Weight: 175,000 lbs
Dimensions
Wingspan: 132 ft 7 in
Length: 99 ft 7 in
Height: 38 ft 8 in
Wing Area: 1,745 sq ft

HC-130H Hercules

C-130H - Hercules

Overview:

The C-130H is a mainstay of the United States Coast Guard air fleet.

The Coast Guard’s fleet currently includes 22 HC-130H, two HC-130H with the Avionics One Upgrade (A1U), and six HC-130J models of the famous Hercules, widely recognized as the West’s premier military transport.

The Coast Guard’s history with the “Herc” dates to 1958, when it first ordered the R8V-1G (HC-130B) model, (now retired.) The configuration of these aircraft is suitable for a variety of missions.

The four-engine, high-wing aircraft can carry 92 passengers, although the usual number is 44, with 14 web seats and pallets with 15 airline-style seats each. The HC-130H can also carry 51,000 pounds of cargo, rescue, or oil-pollution-control equipment.

Operated by a crew of seven (7), the HC-130H can airdrop life rafts or dewatering pumps, or dispersant for oil pollution control.

Air Stations

  • CGAS Sacramento, CA
  • CGAS Clearwater, FL
  • CGAS Kodiak, AK
  • CGAS Barbers Pt., HI

Specifications

Power Plant
Four 4,910 hp Allison T56-A-15 turboprop engines
Performance
Cruising Speed: 374 mph 
Service Ceiling: 33,000 feet 
Range: 2,487 miles
Weight
Empty: 75,743 pounds
Gross Weight: 175,000 pounds
Dimensions
Wingspan: 132 feet, 7 inches
Length: 99 feet, 7 inches
Height: 38 feet, 8 inches
Wing Area: 1,745 square feet

HU-25 Guardian

HC-144A - Ocean Sentry

Overview:

The HU-25 Guardian is a medium-range surveillance fixed-wing aircraft.  Also referred to as the Coast Guard’s “Falcon”, the aircraft is a military derivative of the Dassault Falcon 20 business jet, of which more than 500 were built for worldwide use.  The HU-25 performs search and rescue, law enforcement such as migrant and drug interdiction, marine environmental protection, and military readiness. The first of 41 HU-25s was delivered in February 1982 and deliveries were complete by December 1983.  The HU-25A and HU-25D are 56ft 3in in length (the HU-25C is 57ft 6in), with a wingspan of 53ft 6in and height of 17ft 7in.  The service ceiling is 42,000ft, though current avionics restrict operations to 28,000ft and below.  Maximum cruise speed at altitude is 420kts, with a maximum operating speed of .855 Mach.  Sea-level maximum airspeed is 350kts.

Key features of the Falcon include its dash speed and capable mission sensors.  The three models of the HU-25 (-A, -C, and –D) are distinguished by their sensor complement.  The HU-25A has an APS-127 surface search radar.  The HU-25C has an APG-66 air-to-air/surface search radar, electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensor, and tactical workstation.  The HU-25D has an APS-143B multi-mode radar, EO/IR and tactical workstation.  A sensor upgrade program in 2002-03 improved capabilities in HU-25Cs and reconfigured 6 HU-25As into HU-25Ds.  An avionics upgrade in 2005-06 upgraded the navigation system with modern equipment common to the HH-65B.

Most of the HU-25s have been decommissioned already, with complete phase-out by 2014.  They will be replaced by the HC-144A Ocean Sentry.

Air Station

Specifications

Crew
5
Capacity
8
Length
56 ft 3 in
Wingspan
53ft 6 in
Height
17 ft 7 in
Max takeoff weight
32,000lb
Powerplant
2x Garrett ATF3-6 Turbofan Engines, 5440 lbf each
Speed
420 knots (.855 mach)
Range
1500 nm
Service ceiling
42,000 ft

CG HU25 Picture

Mobile, AL:  HU-25 static display for the 30th Anniversary Ceremony held at ATC Mobile. The HU-25 has been in service with the CG since April 2nd, 1982 and has logged over 500,000 flight hours with an estimated 74,000 SAR flight hours and 244,000 LE hours. With the Falcons departing ATC and Corpus Christi in 2014, the USCG HU-25 era will come to an end, but they won’t stop inspiring and they won’t stop being part of the fabric of Coast Guard history – as one of the fastest overwater rescue assets of all time. HU25s are continuing to be national assets as 5 are currently serving with distinction at NASA and USAF facilities conducting research and national security missions.

MH-65 Dolphin

HH/MH-65C: Dolphin

Overview:

The H-65 helicopter — the Coast Guard’s most ubiquitous aircraft — is certified for operation in all-weather and night-time operations, with the exception of icing conditions. There are 100 H-65s in the inventory.  The H-65 is the primary Coast Guard aircraft used aboard certified cutters during deployments.  FLIR, a heads-up display (HUD) and other avionics upgrades are being installed aboard the H-65 as part of the ongoing conversion-sustainment initiative to sustain the airframe for the foreseeable future.   Furthermore, the re-designation of Airborne Use of Force (AUF) MH-65Cs reflects the installation of armament and a significantly upgraded communications package.  Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron (HITRON) Jacksonville was the first operational Coast Guard unit to employ the MH-65C and has a total of 10 aircraft assigned to replace the MH-68A Stingray aircraft.  The current transition to the MH-65D is designed to address obsolete component issues and is slated to be complete by summer of 2015.  In FY17 the Coast Guard will introduce the MH-65E to the fleet.  Currently under development, the MH-65E will feature an all-glass cockpit with advanced navigation capabilities to meet emerging FAA requirements.

Air Stations

  • CGAS Traverse City, Michigan
  • CGAS Barbers Point, Hawaii
  • CGAS Borinquen, Puerto Rico
  • CGAS Atlantic City, New Jersey
  • CGAS Corpus Christi, Texas
  • CGAS Detroit, Michigan
  • CGAS HITRON Jacksonville, FL
  • CGAS Houston, Texas
  • CGAS Humbolt Bay, California
  • CGAS Los Angeles, California
  • CGAS Miami, Florida
  • ATC Mobile, Alabama
  • CGAS New Orleans, Louisiana
  • CGAS North Bend, Oregon
  • CGAS San Francisco, California
  • CGAS Port Angeles, Washington
  • CGAS Savannah, Georgia

Specifications

Power Plant
MH-65C: Two 853 shp Turbomeca Arriel 2C2-CG has turbine engines
Performance
Max Speed: 175 knots (MH-65C)
Cruising Speed: 148 knots (MH-65C)
Service Ceiling ~10,000 ft 
Range: 290 nautical miles (MH-65C)
Weight
Gross Weight:9,480 lbs (MH-65C)
Dimensions
Rotor Diameter: 39ft 2in
Length: 44ft 5in
Height: 13ft 5in
Armament
Single 7.62mm M240B/H machine gun
7.62mm shoulder-fired precision weapon
.50-caliber shoulder-fired precision weapon
Crew
2 pilots
1 flight mechanic
1 rescue swimmer

MH-60J/T Jayhawk

MH-60J/T - Jayhawk

Overview:

The MH-60 is an all weather, medium-range helicopter (specialized for search and recovery) similar to the Navy MH-60R and MH-60S Seahawk, with its basic roots in the Army H-60 Blackhawk. The service began to operate the MH-60J in 1990 as a replacement to the now-retired HH-3F Pelican, and it is typically operated by a crew of four. The last unit operating the MH-60J is CGAS Clearwater. They are currently completing the MH-60J to MH-60T transition which will be completed in May 2013.

There are 42 total MH-60s in the Coast Guard air fleet, with 35 in operational use, most of which have undergone the MH-60T conversion since 2008. Seven H-60s are at various levels of depot maintenance and MH-60T upgrade at the Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, NC. The MH-60T upgrade consist of a Rockwell Collins Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS). CAAS is an integrated “glass” cockpit which provides updated avionics and integrated Electro-optical Sensor System with recording capability via a removable memory module. CAAS also replaces legacy radios with the AN/ARC 210, ARC 220 and the RT-5000/SAR radios.

The MH-60 is located at seven Coast Guard and ATC Mobile Air Stations, equipped with sensors and equipment for search and rescue missions. Four H-60 units Maintain Airborne Use of Force (AUF) and all of the MH-60s are AUF equipped.

Air Stations

  • ATC Mobile, Alabama
  • CGAS Kodiak, Alaska
  • CGAS Sitka, Alaska
  • CGAS San Diego, California
  • CGAS Clearwater, Florida
  • CGAS Cape Cod, Massachusetts
  • CGAS Elizabeth City, NC
  • CGAS Astoria, OR

Specifications

Power Plant
Two 1,560 shp General Electric T700-GE-401C turboshaft engines
Performance
Max Speed: 180 knots
Service Ceiling: 18,000 ft
Range: 700 nautical miles
Weight
Empty: 14,500 lbs
Gross Weight: 21,884 lbs
Armament
Single 7.62mm M240J machine gun
7.62mm shoulder-fired precision weapon
Dimensions
Rotor Diameter: 53ft 8in
Length: 64ft 10in
Height: 17ft
Main Rotor Disc Area: 2,261 sq ft